Ron Swanson once stated, “There’s only one thing I hate worse than lying—skim milk, which is water that’s lying about being skim milk.”

Today the SEC announced that it has charged Swanson with his second-least-favorite thing: lying in the form of securities fraud.   The SEC alleges that Ronald D. Swanson, the former chief executive officer

Securities and Exchange Commission (the Commission) Chairman Jay Clayton today addressed the much anticipated delay to the compliance deadline for Regulation Best Interest (Reg BI), Form CRS and the related transparency obligations in the new regulation by stating there will be NO DELAY of the June 30, 2020 deadline because of the Covid-19 pandemic.¹
Continue Reading The SEC Opts Not to Extend Reg BI and Form CRS Compliance Deadline

The Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”) on Friday, March 13, 2020, granted temporary relief under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 relative to certain filing and delivery deadlines and other requirements that the adviser cannot meet because of the current COVID-19 pandemic. See INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 Release No. 5463 (March 13, 2020) (the “Order”).

Continue Reading The SEC Grants Temporary Relief Due to the Coronavirus COVID-19 Pandemic

On December 18, 2019, the SEC proposed to amend its definition of “Accredited Investor” with hopes to expand access to private capital markets to a wider range of investors.[1] The proposed changes create two new categories of natural persons who may be considered “accredited investors” and add to the categories of institutional investors who qualify. According to the SEC’s press release regarding the proposed changes, the purpose of the changes is to more effectively identify investors that have the “knowledge and expertise” to safely invest in private markets without the additional investor protections created by the filing requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Securities Act”).[2]

Continue Reading SEC Proposes to Update “Accredited Investor” Definition

As everyone in the securities industry appreciates, a registered representative’s departure from one broker-dealer firm to join another is a not uncommon event. Such departures, even when voluntary and made on good terms, can and often raise a host of issues. Just last year for instance, FINRA issued Regulatory Notice 19-10 (April 5, 2019), which can be found here.
Continue Reading Risky Business: How Departing Brokers Can Unintentionally Trip Reg. BI

KPMG must pay $50 million after the Securities and Exchange Commission charged the accounting giant with cheating on training exams and using purloined information concerning audit inspections to be conducted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB).  KPMG agreed to the $50 million penalty and also accepted a public censure as part of the settlement.
Continue Reading Audit Firm to Pay $50 Million Penalty for Using Information Pilfered From PCAOB

Celadon Group Inc. announced a settlement with the SEC and the DOJ over allegations of accounting fraud.[1]  The company agreed to pay restitution of over $42 million in connection with a Deferred Prosecution Agreement with the DOJ, and to pay disgorgement of roughly $7.5 million in a parallel SEC settlement.  The disgorgement obligation is deemed satisfied by payment of the $42 million restitution amount.
Continue Reading Freight Company Charged with Truckload of Accounting Fraud

The SEC recently announced insider-trading charges against the former senior lawyer at Apple specifically tasked with ensuring insider-trading compliance at the company.[1]  The Department of Justice also addressed this case of “the fox guarding the hen house” by filing criminal charges against the former Apple attorney.  The defendant, Gene Daniel Levoff, denies all charges and vows to defend himself.
Continue Reading Attorney Responsible for Insider-Trading Compliance Faces Charges of…Insider Trading