By Toby M. Galloway,  Matthias Kleinsasser,  Joe Wielebinski

In sports, it is often said that “winning cures everything.”  The same concept applies to uncovering fraud.  When the economy is strong and most investors are making money, there is little incentive to ask difficult questions about a company’s performance.  Once the economy craters, however, investors begin demanding answers and harsh truths are often revealed.  As Warren Buffett has said, “only when the tide goes out do you discover who’s been swimming naked.”
Continue Reading Fraud in the Time of Covid-19

On December 18, 2019, the SEC proposed to amend its definition of “Accredited Investor” with hopes to expand access to private capital markets to a wider range of investors.[1] The proposed changes create two new categories of natural persons who may be considered “accredited investors” and add to the categories of institutional investors who qualify. According to the SEC’s press release regarding the proposed changes, the purpose of the changes is to more effectively identify investors that have the “knowledge and expertise” to safely invest in private markets without the additional investor protections created by the filing requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Securities Act”).[2]

Continue Reading SEC Proposes to Update “Accredited Investor” Definition

Last year the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) approved Regulation Best Interest (“Reg BI”).[1] Reg BI requires broker-dealers and their associated persons to act in “the best interest” of a retail customer when recommending a securities transaction or investment strategy. Reg BI applies not only to broker-dealers but also to investment advisors.[2] It will take effect in June of 2020.[3]
Continue Reading It’s the Final Countdown: Being Prepared for Regulation Best Interest