By Toby M. Galloway,  Matthias Kleinsasser,  Joe Wielebinski

In sports, it is often said that “winning cures everything.”  The same concept applies to uncovering fraud.  When the economy is strong and most investors are making money, there is little incentive to ask difficult questions about a company’s performance.  Once the economy craters, however, investors begin demanding answers and harsh truths are often revealed.  As Warren Buffett has said, “only when the tide goes out do you discover who’s been swimming naked.” Continue Reading Fraud in the Time of Covid-19

Management.com has a new article, found here, that points to the importance of an investment adviser or RIA firm borrower getting their SBA Paycheck Protection Program loan application right the first time: “What you don’t want is to submit an application that’s incomplete and you have to fix it … [because then] you [fall] to the back of the queue.” Meeting the legal requirements is also key.

Our Winstead team including Andrew Rosell , Jennifer Knapek,  and our SL&E team are already consulting with and assisting current and new advisory clients on PPP SBA loan applications. Fellow Winstead attorney John Adolph has summarized the material information here.

Securities and Exchange Commission (the Commission) Chairman Jay Clayton today addressed the much anticipated delay to the compliance deadline for Regulation Best Interest (Reg BI), Form CRS and the related transparency obligations in the new regulation by stating there will be NO DELAY of the June 30, 2020 deadline because of the Covid-19 pandemic.¹ Continue Reading The SEC Opts Not to Extend Reg BI and Form CRS Compliance Deadline

This week the Delaware Supreme Court ruled that Delaware corporations may enforce federal forum selection clauses (so-called federal forum provisions or “FFPs”) for lawsuits alleging breaches of the Securities Act of 1933. See Salzberg v. Sciabacucchi, No. 346, 2019, 2020 Del. LEXIS 100 (March 18, 2020). This ruling is significant because Delaware companies can require the filing of ‘33 Act claims, including class actions, in federal court. Federal court is perceived as a more favorable forum than state court, including because of dismissal procedures and the perceived familiarity of federal jurists with the federal securities acts. By statute, for instance, federal courts already have exclusive jurisdiction of claims under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, i.e. Section 10(b) and Rule 10b-5 actions.

Continue Reading Keeping it All in the Family

The Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”) on Friday, March 13, 2020, granted temporary relief under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 relative to certain filing and delivery deadlines and other requirements that the adviser cannot meet because of the current COVID-19 pandemic. See INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 Release No. 5463 (March 13, 2020) (the “Order”).

Continue Reading The SEC Grants Temporary Relief Due to the Coronavirus COVID-19 Pandemic

On December 18, 2019, the SEC proposed to amend its definition of “Accredited Investor” with hopes to expand access to private capital markets to a wider range of investors.[1] The proposed changes create two new categories of natural persons who may be considered “accredited investors” and add to the categories of institutional investors who qualify. According to the SEC’s press release regarding the proposed changes, the purpose of the changes is to more effectively identify investors that have the “knowledge and expertise” to safely invest in private markets without the additional investor protections created by the filing requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Securities Act”).[2]

Continue Reading SEC Proposes to Update “Accredited Investor” Definition

Hollywood martial arts sensei Steven Seagal was recently karate-chopped by the SEC for his alleged undisclosed payments for Twitter-touting a security that was being offered and sold in an initial coin offering.  In a settled cease-and-desist order, the Moscow-based B movie actor consented to a violation of Section 17(b) of the Securities Act of 1933, which prohibits the promotion of a security without fully disclosing the receipt and amount of compensation for such promotion.  The SEC found that that Seagal was kung fu fighting on behalf of something called Bitcoiin2Gen in the promotion of investment contracts to be issued on the Ethereum blockchain.  The operator of the dojo with no mojo agreed to repay $314,000 to settle the charges involved in the practice commonly known as scalping.

As everyone in the securities industry appreciates, a registered representative’s departure from one broker-dealer firm to join another is a not uncommon event. Such departures, even when voluntary and made on good terms, can and often raise a host of issues. Just last year for instance, FINRA issued Regulatory Notice 19-10 (April 5, 2019), which can be found here. Continue Reading Risky Business: How Departing Brokers Can Unintentionally Trip Reg. BI

Last year the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) approved Regulation Best Interest (“Reg BI”).[1] Reg BI requires broker-dealers and their associated persons to act in “the best interest” of a retail customer when recommending a securities transaction or investment strategy. Reg BI applies not only to broker-dealers but also to investment advisors.[2] It will take effect in June of 2020.[3] Continue Reading It’s the Final Countdown: Being Prepared for Regulation Best Interest

The Fifth Circuit overturned a U.S. District Court’s approval of a settlement between Ralph Janvey, the Receiver for Stanford International Bank, and various insurance company Underwriters, under which the Underwriters had agreed to pay $65 million to the Stanford Receivership estate.  Writing for the Court, Judge Edith H. Jones held that the District Court abused its discretion in approving the settlement because the injunction issued by the District Court (referred to as a “bar order”) nullified claims by third-party coinsureds to policy proceeds without an alternative compensation scheme.  The settlement also improperly released third-party tort and statutory claims against the Underwriters that the estate did not own. Continue Reading Fifth Circuit Overturns Receiver’s Settlement Barring Third-Party Claims Against Stanford Financial Insurers